Small steps. Big impact.

THE FITBIT BLOG

8 Adventure Travel Ideas to Get Your #VacationFit On!

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Going on holiday doesn’t have to derail your health and fitness goals. Stay in shape or put your fitness to the test on your next vacation with these active destination ideas. Not ready to sign up this summer? Start training now and plan ahead for next year!

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2 Ways to Prevent Pesky Joint Pain

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Prevent pesky joint pain

*Article courtesy of womensrunning.com.*

When runners work to prevent injury, it is often the muscles we think first to protect, stretch and roll out at the end of a long day out on the roads or trails. Though we should always focus on being proactive and protecting our hard-working muscles, there is another part of the body that we may not be focused on enough: our joints.

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5 Reasons to Run Your First 5K

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5 Reasons to run your first 5k

If you’ve always dreamed of being a runner or completing a race but have felt too intimidated by the idea of extreme distances and tough training, fear not!  A 5K is the perfect race for beginners and is surprisingly easy to prepare for. Here are five reasons you should conquer 3.1 miles.

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Failure Re-Framed: The Upside of Finishing Last

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The upside of finishing last

I love running, but I wouldn’t say I’m great at it, or a natural by any means. I’m “middle of the pack” when it comes to speed, and I’ve worked hard to get there. As a teenager running high school cross country, I was consistently the last female across the finish line at races and invitationals. It sucked. I wanted to quit. My dad wouldn’t let me.

It’s hard enough being a self-conscious teen, adding a solidly earned “loser” title week after week made it that much tougher. At the time, the sting of losing was almost unbearable. I felt like I wasn’t good enough. I thought everyone was judging me for being slow. It was embarrassing.

Today, I’m glad I had to listen to my dad. I learned a valuable lesson about what it means to fail, and why it’s important to keep trying. It’s a theme that continues to come up in life and in goal setting for health and fitness. No matter whether your struggle is to run a 5K or simply walk a mile, failing can actually make you stronger. Here’s how to re-frame your way of thinking and find the upside of falling short.

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5 Kettlebell Exercises for Runners

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Kettlebells can be intimidating. They look heavy and the exercises are odd. But here’s a little secret—they’re actually easier to lift than dumbbells and work multiple muscles at once.

Kettlebells have gained popularity over the years and for good reason: They are effective and efficient. You can burn up to 20 calories per minute. So a 20-minute workout could be a 400-calorie scorcher while challenging multiple muscles at once, especially your core.

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It’s National Running Day! Here’s How to Celebrate

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060115_Fitbit_BLOG_Running_Day_1200x2048_WD_1Yep, that’s right! Today is another “When did this become a holiday?” holiday. But unlike all those other special days, you won’t have to side-step cupcakes in the break room or feel guilty for forgetting to send mom a card.

Today is a day made just for you and your most comfortable footwear! Need a little motivation to get the party started? Get your legs moving with these tips.

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Ultra Runner Dean Karnazes On Why Speed Matters

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Race season is upon us, and whether you’re a weathered runner or are still thinking about signing up for your first 5k, we’ll be here with training tips all season long. 

Train like a pro with Dean Karnazes and Fitbit

If you’re preparing for your first race, you probably already have a good sense of what you need to do to get to the finish line. You’ve likely invested in a good pair of shoes, and you’re probably tracking your progress with some of the great technology available today, like Fitbit Charge or Surge. But you may not be mixing up your routine enough or adding in speed work.

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Join Fitbit for Your Next Race

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Dean Karnazes runs through Death Valley

Race season is upon us! If you’re feeling inspired to sign up for a race this year, or are simply looking to up your step count, we’re here to help.

Fitbit is the official fitness tracker of Destination Races. Destination Races is the visionary producer of the Wine Country Half Marathon Series offering unforgettable race weekends for runners and food and wine enthusiasts alike, complete with scenic courses, post-race Wine & Music festivals, and exclusive access to esteemed wineries, gourmet tastings, and local personalities.

Not only is Fitbit the official fitness tracker, but we’re also partnering with Destination Races in training! With the help of Fitbit ambassador and Ultramarathoner Dean Karnazes, we’ll be getting you race ready by providing training tips along the way. And you can check out the training page to get motivated, download training schedules, and stay on track, whether you’re working towards your first 5K or are doing a 1/2 Marathon.

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How Dean Karnazes Uses Heart Rate Data While Training

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Ultramarathon Man Dean Karnazes explains how heart rate tech helps him train

PurePulse Heart Rate is a new technology at Fitbit that we’re really proud of. Included in both the ChargeHR and Surge, it offers continuous, automatic, wrist-based heart rate and simplified heart rate zones. Tracking your heart rate allows you to accurately track your calorie burn, maintain workout intensity, maximize training, and optimize your results. But how do you use it?

We turned to Fitbit ambassador and ultramarathon man Dean Karnazes to learn how he uses the heart rate tracking in his Fitbit Surge while training for his races.

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Fitbit Inspiration: Jennifer C.

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Tough Mudder image

Running isn’t a hobby it’s a career, and on February 27, 2014 my career got a little more interesting. That was the day I got invited to join a work group to complete Tough Mudder.

In the beginning, I was thrilled telling myself that it’s just like some of the other obstacle races I had run, only longer. At the time, I was averaging 10K steps per day, using my Fitbit Zip to calculate each move I made.

With only seven months to train, I knew I had my work cut out for me. My primary goal was just getting up to a 12-mile run, about three times longer than my usual distance. Each week I added 1K steps to my run until I hit my 12-mile goal, I then decided to make it a little more challenging.

My weekends began to fill with 10-mile trail walks on Saturdays and 12-mile trail runs on Sundays. At this point, two months before Tough Mudder, I felt I was trained and ready to go. But then I started browsing the race website and quickly realized: I was not ready.

My Zip pushed me to get gradually increase my steps/distance, betting my time and training.

Needless to say, I increased my workout intensity lifting weights, swinging kettlebells, kickboxing, and completing various core workouts to increase my upper body and core strength as quickly as possible. The ultimate goal was preparing for a Tough Mudder obstacle called Everest—a quarter pipe climb covered in mud and grease. With just one month to train for this terrifying climb,  the one tool that I used the most was my Zip.

I found the highest hill near my house and ran all-out wind sprints. I started with just a few feet, but gradually increased to sprinting the entire hill and back several times. My Zip pushed me to get gradually increase my steps/distance, betting my time and training.

On the morning of race day, I was nervous and excited. At 9am we were on the road and by 10am, at the starting line to the Tough Mudder in Montgomery City, MO. In the back of my pants was a zipper pouch where I had my most reliable tool, my Fitbit, in two plastic bags hoping that it would survive along with me on our 12-mile obstacle race.

With my husband by my side, we completed one obstacle after another—even one where I had to carry him 500 feet!

We jumped in the arctic enema (think tank full of ice water) diving underwater, shaking as I moved through the ice bath to the opposite side.

The final obstacle—a muddy sprint through a barrage of hanging, electrically charged wires—stood between me and the finish line. With a couple shocks to my frame, I crossed the finish line, hoping my Zip was still in one piece.

Through all the mud, water, and obstacles both me and my trusty Zip and survived. It tracked all 12 miles, validating one of the most physically challenging days of my life.

It’s amazing what a person can accomplish by overcoming your fears with the tools and team to help achieve your goals.