Small steps. Big impact.

THE FITBIT BLOG

5 Kettlebell Exercises for Runners

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Kettlebells can be intimidating. They look heavy and the exercises are odd. But here’s a little secret—they’re actually easier to lift than dumbbells and work multiple muscles at once.

Kettlebells have gained popularity over the years and for good reason: They are effective and efficient. You can burn up to 20 calories per minute. So a 20-minute workout could be a 400-calorie scorcher while challenging multiple muscles at once, especially your core.

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It’s National Running Day! Here’s How to Celebrate

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060115_Fitbit_BLOG_Running_Day_1200x2048_WD_1Yep, that’s right! Today is another “When did this become a holiday?” holiday. But unlike all those other special days, you won’t have to side-step cupcakes in the break room or feel guilty for forgetting to send mom a card.

Today is a day made just for you and your most comfortable footwear! Need a little motivation to get the party started? Get your legs moving with these tips.

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Ultra Runner Dean Karnazes On Why Speed Matters

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Race season is upon us, and whether you’re a weathered runner or are still thinking about signing up for your first 5k, we’ll be here with training tips all season long. 

Train like a pro with Dean Karnazes and Fitbit

If you’re preparing for your first race, you probably already have a good sense of what you need to do to get to the finish line. You’ve likely invested in a good pair of shoes, and you’re probably tracking your progress with some of the great technology available today, like Fitbit Charge or Surge. But you may not be mixing up your routine enough or adding in speed work.

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Join Fitbit for Your Next Race

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Dean Karnazes runs through Death Valley

Race season is upon us! If you’re feeling inspired to sign up for a race this year, or are simply looking to up your step count, we’re here to help.

Fitbit is the official fitness tracker of Destination Races. Destination Races is the visionary producer of the Wine Country Half Marathon Series offering unforgettable race weekends for runners and food and wine enthusiasts alike, complete with scenic courses, post-race Wine & Music festivals, and exclusive access to esteemed wineries, gourmet tastings, and local personalities.

Not only is Fitbit the official fitness tracker, but we’re also partnering with Destination Races in training! With the help of Fitbit ambassador and Ultramarathoner Dean Karnazes, we’ll be getting you race ready by providing training tips along the way. And you can check out the training page to get motivated, download training schedules, and stay on track, whether you’re working towards your first 5K or are doing a 1/2 Marathon.

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How Dean Karnazes Uses Heart Rate Data While Training

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Ultramarathon Man Dean Karnazes explains how heart rate tech helps him train

PurePulse Heart Rate is a new technology at Fitbit that we’re really proud of. Included in both the ChargeHR and Surge, it offers continuous, automatic, wrist-based heart rate and simplified heart rate zones. Tracking your heart rate allows you to accurately track your calorie burn, maintain workout intensity, maximize training, and optimize your results. But how do you use it?

We turned to Fitbit ambassador and ultramarathon man Dean Karnazes to learn how he uses the heart rate tracking in his Fitbit Surge while training for his races.

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Fitbit Inspiration: Jennifer C.

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Running isn’t a hobby it’s a career, and on February 27, 2014 my career got a little more interesting. That was the day I got invited to join a work group to complete Tough Mudder.

In the beginning, I was thrilled telling myself that it’s just like some of the other obstacle races I had run, only longer. At the time, I was averaging 10K steps per day, using my Fitbit Zip to calculate each move I made.

With only seven months to train, I knew I had my work cut out for me. My primary goal was just getting up to a 12-mile run, about three times longer than my usual distance. Each week I added 1K steps to my run until I hit my 12-mile goal, I then decided to make it a little more challenging.

My weekends began to fill with 10-mile trail walks on Saturdays and 12-mile trail runs on Sundays. At this point, two months before Tough Mudder, I felt I was trained and ready to go. But then I started browsing the race website and quickly realized: I was not ready.

My Zip pushed me to get gradually increase my steps/distance, betting my time and training.

Needless to say, I increased my workout intensity lifting weights, swinging kettlebells, kickboxing, and completing various core workouts to increase my upper body and core strength as quickly as possible. The ultimate goal was preparing for a Tough Mudder obstacle called Everest—a quarter pipe climb covered in mud and grease. With just one month to train for this terrifying climb,  the one tool that I used the most was my Zip.

I found the highest hill near my house and ran all-out wind sprints. I started with just a few feet, but gradually increased to sprinting the entire hill and back several times. My Zip pushed me to get gradually increase my steps/distance, betting my time and training.

On the morning of race day, I was nervous and excited. At 9am we were on the road and by 10am, at the starting line to the Tough Mudder in Montgomery City, MO. In the back of my pants was a zipper pouch where I had my most reliable tool, my Fitbit, in two plastic bags hoping that it would survive along with me on our 12-mile obstacle race.

With my husband by my side, we completed one obstacle after another—even one where I had to carry him 500 feet!

We jumped in the arctic enema (think tank full of ice water) diving underwater, shaking as I moved through the ice bath to the opposite side.

The final obstacle—a muddy sprint through a barrage of hanging, electrically charged wires—stood between me and the finish line. With a couple shocks to my frame, I crossed the finish line, hoping my Zip was still in one piece.

Through all the mud, water, and obstacles both me and my trusty Zip and survived. It tracked all 12 miles, validating one of the most physically challenging days of my life.

It’s amazing what a person can accomplish by overcoming your fears with the tools and team to help achieve your goals.

 

Cold Weather Training: 6 Tips for Running in the Fall & Winter

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We recently wrote about Fall fitness tips to help you keep pumped and active all season long. But today, let’s take it a step further with specific tips for all you runners/joggers out there!

If you’re planning to stay on schedule with your running as the weather’s getting cold, there are some extra things to keep in mind. Race season may be months away, but keeping up with your running goals now will help you pick up your training right where you left off once the weather warms up.

Here’s how to stay focused:

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From Steps to IRONMAN: Running for Melanoma Research

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IM Kona Nicole

Hi, I’m Nicole Serraiocco. I’m a wife, mother of three adorable maniacs, and soon I’ll be an IRONMAN. I’m not a fitness expert or a lifelong devotee to sport. In fact, I only completed my first marathon less than a year ago. But the universe seems to have conspired to present me with this challenge and I’ve decided to accept.

I spend most of my days wrangling three young children, carting them to school and their various activities, trying to keep the house in some kind of relative order and squeeze in workouts when I can. I’ve found that being a part of a class or a group keeps me accountable and motivated, and it was as a member of one of these groups that I met the man who threw the proverbial IRONMAN glove in my face; my rockstar coach, Thad Beaty.

Thad and I discovered that we had the same shared history of losing loved ones to Melanoma cancer, myself having lost my father shortly after I was married, and now supporting a dear friend and mother of three who has been diagnosed with Stage 3 Melanoma.

The other day I realized it was only 9am and I had already logged close to 30K steps.

After losing his IRONMAN Kona-inspired teammate Naomi Cermak to the cancer last year, Thad wanted to make an impact on this common disease that seems to get so little attention in the press. He saw something in me, some crazy fire and determination, that prompted him to team me up with the Melanoma Research Foundation as their official IRONMAN athlete for the World Championships at Kona, 2014. Together, we’ve committed to raising $50,000 for the awareness and prevention of Melanoma.

A Day In The Life

My challenge, (aside from tackling the biggest, scariest endurance race of my life) is to find the balance between taking care of myself, taking care of this commitment and taking care of my family.

Taking care of my family means I have to do most of my training early in the morning. If I want to squeeze in a 14-mile run before the kids get up, that means I get up at 4:15am for a run, to be done in time to get the first kid on the bus at 6:30am.

The other day I realized it was only 9am and I had already logged close to 30K steps. I’m bound to get some helicopter badges here, right? read more

The Mindful Marathon: How to Stay Mentally Composed During a Race

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Fall race season is officially in gear. There are some great training plans out there to help you reach your physical goal, but what about the mental aspect?

People often ask me what I think about when I run and what I do when a race is going badly. In ultra-running, we call it going into the “pain cave.” It happens in marathons too, usually around mile 20 (or as early as mile 13, if you’ve started out too fast, which I’ve definitely done).

Here’s my trick for staying in a positive place. It’s my running meditation, and I do it constantly throughout all my races — from 5Ks all the way to 100-mile finish lines. read more

Preparing for Your First 5K

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3.1 miles — the perfect distance for your first foray into one of the world’s most popular sports (for the record, that’s about 6,000 Fitbit steps). We’ll help you navigate some of the obstacles that trip people up when they’re starting a running program for the first time, or coming back to running after a break.

Here’s how to properly get started.

See also: 5 Beneficial Reasons to Run

And don’t forget to register for the first ever Fitbit Tiburon Half Marathon & 5K. read more